You are viewing mmerriam

Driving Blind: Car Stories

Old Lynx
I've been putting together my part of the "Invisible People" fringe show and thinking about my blindness how it impacts my life.

Sometimes people will ask me if miss driving. My knee-jerk response is "Yes," but what I really miss is the independence, which is what they are really asking me about anyway. But the driving? Well…

It occurs to me that I could write a one-man storytelling show about Michael and his complicated and frankly unsafe relationship with cars as a younger man. Seriously.

Don't believe me. I'll post little quick snippets on Facebook and Twitter, just teasers, with the hashtag #carstories over the next couple of days.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Post 4th Street Fantasy Convention Report

Old Lynx
So 4th Street Fantasy Con. That's a thing that happened this past weekend.

I had a really good convention, in general. I didn't make it to all the panels (panel fatigue hit late on Saturday), but the ones I attended were special. I am sad that I missed the "Advice From New Writers" panel on Sunday morning. I had been on that same panel some years ago and was keen to hear what today's new writers had to say, but we were out late Saturday, and sleep was thing that we needed, desperately needed. I think my two favorite panels where "The Influence of Anxiety" and "The Revision Process" (which was our "But That's A Different Panel" winner).

As a panelist, I wasn't at my best this year. I was too slow witted and had trouble sometimes following the various lines of high-level, rapid fire conversation. I attribute part of this to being low level sick all weekend (allergies and migraines) and my meds slowing me down, but I admit that sometimes 4th Street Panels and audience members leave me in the dust with their academic gymnastics and brilliant, deep questions and thoughts. I felt like I handled myself better during the after-panel and dinner discussions, where I had more time to marshal my thoughts and give them coherent form.

I was talking about this with a couple of other writers on Saturday night and we came to the conclusion that there needs to be a panel that is something like "Imposter Syndrome: 4th Street Edition" next year. 4th Street always makes me feel like I'm playing way out of my league and weight-class, but at the same time I always feel like I leave the convention with my game and abilities lifted and improved just a little.

That aside, it was a wonderful convention and gave me a change to reconnect with folks I only see at this convention. One of my favorite things about 4th Street is the ongoing conversation and the chance to have that conversation with friends old and new very June. I look forward to being part of the 4th Street Fantasy Conversation for many years to come.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

4th Street Fantasy Convention

Old Lynx
4th Street Fantasy Convention is fast approaching. As in it is happening on June 20th through June 22nd. Given that, it seems a good time to stop and post my schedule.

Saturday, June 21, 2014
9:30 AM - Originality and Micro-genre
Readers who are versed in a sub-genre and its conventions can find what outsiders see as minor variations on a theme to be significant and original differences. How does this relate to the frequently expressed desire among critics for originality and ambition, and how is the perception of originality informed by the breadth/focus of readers' experiences?

Seanan McGuire, Elizabeth Bear (m), Caroline Stevermer, Michael Merriam, Christopher K Davis


Saturday, June 21, 2014
2:00 PM - History as Trade Secret
Fantasy has a long tradition of borrowing (and outright stealing) the best bits from history and remixing them to taste. Sometimes historicity is just an aesthetic gloss, but in others it serves as the foundation for rich, detailed, and complex works. What makes us admire an author bending history to their ends, and which excesses snap our suspension of disbelief?

Tim Cooper (m), Alec Austin, Ann Chatham, Dana Baird, Michael Merriam

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #17

Oney
Another not very good week for working on the novel. I need to figure out some kind of writing schedule, but my personal life seems to be in such a constant state of changing gears that I can't find stability in the chaos to work. I'm too tired after work. Weekends are always packed. My two days off seem to evaporate in housework and daily minutia.

It's starting to drive me a little nuts. I get a little nuts when I'm not writing. Maybe more than a little nuts.

Went to the Pratt Community Ice Cream Social last Friday. I did not climb the Witch's Tower water tower, instead hanging out in the park while the rest of my crew climbed up to the observation deck. I found myself having interesting conversation with charming strangers who would come and share the picnic table I was at. Saturday we the first production meeting for the Minnesota Fringe Festival show I'm going to be in this year. We are rolling along, and I expect we shall have a read-through of our stories pretty soon.

1. 1700 words written.
2. Went back and added to a couple of scenes in the 1979 section.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

At the Intersection of Life and Fiction

Streetcar
Sometimes life and fiction are a little odd. In my novel Last Car to Annwn Station there is a scene where Mae is in Uptown and runs into Jill. Mae wants to walk over to Dunn Brothers Coffee, but Jill convinces her to go to Muddy Paws instead for both coffee and cheesecake. This scene, which includes them being chased by the Cwn Annwn, is the one I read to audiences.

Muddy Paws closed before the novel came out, and I wrestled with maybe moving the location, but after some discussion with first readers and other writers, left it in as a sort of "Ah!" thing for locals who remember Muddy Paws with fondness. The shop has been sat empty for years.

Well, things come full circle. Last Saturday while riding the bus to the first production meeting for the Minnesota Fringe Festival show I'm going to be in, I saw that Dunn Brothers is moving into the space Muddy Paws vacated. In honor of the new location and with a nod to the ways fiction and life intersect, I thought I'd post that except here. If you are interested, you can pick up Last Car in ebook format at Carina Press, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and in audio format at Audible.

Last Car to Annwn Excerpt Behind This CutCollapse )

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #16

Oney
Another week of poor writing metrics. I am hopeful things are turning around now that I've figured out why I had stalled. I didn't get as much writing done as I would have liked over the holiday weekend, but sometimes that's just the way life goes.

1. Wrote about 1700 words.
2. Untangled a plot knot.
3. Made a realization about one of my characters.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #15

Oney
So. Minnesota Fringe Festival. That's a thing I'm going to be in again this year. The "Invisible People" show I'm part of came in off the waitlist. "Invisible People" as in people other people like to pretend don't exist. Like, you know, gimps like me. I am thrilled and a little scared.

My acoustic bass has picked up a nasty buzzing noise. I'm going to have to get it looked at by a real luthier, when I have some spare cash. In the meantime, I'll get the electric bass back out of the closet.

Finished reading the entire Randell Garrett "Lord Darcy" set of stories and novel. Enjoyed it a lot. Also went to see Walking Shadow Theatre Company's adaptation of The Three Muskateers. It was great rollicking fun and still has a week left in the run. Go see it!

Not much writing this week. A little over 1000 words. I can remember a time when I wrote that many words in a day. Still, forward movement is forward movement.

1. Wrote 1100 words
2. Made a 1920s music playlist
3. Worked on the notes I collected from the Oney Facebook Community.
4. Outlined most of the rest of the 1929 section.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #14

Oney
I managed to get some pretty good writing done this week, most of it in coffee shops while waiting to be at other events. I spent a lot of my week dealing with my previous post about Convergence, but at least the conversation about the convention was civil. I also had the pleasure to moderate the panel "Adapting Fiction for Stage," for the Minnesota Speculative Fiction Writers.

1. Wrote about 2200 words on the novel
2. Did some research in books and online
3. Posted a question to the Oney Facebook Community, got several good answers
4. Realized I may have a plot problem. Started working to resolve it.
5. Reread everything I've written so far.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Hide
I've been attending Convergence since 2002. I've watched it grow and morph, watched it struggle and triumph over those struggles. Watched it become the nearly 7000 member convention it has become. Convergence has been pretty good to me, having me as an invited participant for the last few years and hosting several of my book release parties. I sell twice as many books at Convergence as I do at any other Twin Cities convention.

And now I have to walk away.

It has simply become too much for the blind writer and fan to deal with. Too much noise, too much crowds, too much drunken twenty-somethings. Just…too much.

For the last few years, I've struggled more and more at Convergence. Just the logistics of packing and preparing for Convergence is stressful. The line to pick up badges seems to be getting longer and slower every year. The load into the hotel is always hot and sweaty (The con is over July 4th weekend) and the load out takes forever because of the elevator problems. Ask me about the night I climbed 22 flights of stairs. Ask me how faster, younger able bodied people would happily charge forward and cram into the thing before those of us with canes or chairs can even start forward, squeezing us out in their mad dash to get aboard. Tough luck, gimp.

But it's the crowds that finally killed the convention for me.

Crowds are a fact of life at larger conventions, but it's something I struggle to deal with to the point of sometimes getting so overwhelmed that I give up and go up to the room to hide. Now granted, I'm an introvert and at conventions I try to be "on" as much as possible--smiling, chatting, being social--which is exhausting to me. So I dive back into the room to recharge.

But the crowds, oh the crowds.

People at conventions don't pay attention to their surroundings, they’re too busy talking and looking at all the shiny and at Convergence they are packed shoulder-to-shoulder in the hallways and it doesn't matter if I'm using the cane, all I'm doing is hitting people who glance at the cane and then move on as I hit some other oblivious con-goer. Any moment I'm in the hallways and trying to get around on my own is fraught with peril -- near-misses, people tripping over the cane, and accidentally body-checking strangers into walls. It is especially bad with small children, who tend to dash one direction while looking the other, often right under my feet. I don't even go into the dealer's room at Convergence. It presents all the same problems as above, now with bonus narrow aisles and displays lying in ambush, waiting for the hapless blind guy to stumble into them. Going into the dealer's room (or art show) without assistance is impossible and with assistance still too difficult to manage.

The final thing the crowds tend to do is "blind" me. I'm already struggling with not being able to see much of anything in a rapidly changing environment, but the noise--especially around the party rooms (which I've learned to avoid)--basically leaves me without my other primary way of telling me what is happening around me. If I can't see clearly, and I can't hear clearly, what chance do I have? I've had to drop out of some things I wanted to do, simply because it became too hard on me in those situations to deal with the environment. There have been several moments where I quite literally froze in place because I lost my bearings and could not navigate my surroundings safely. It is a frustrating thing. It has gotten so bad that the year before last, I froze up in a crowd to the point that I simply couldn't move—couldn't even pull my cellphone and call for help—was trapped by both a crowd induced panic attack and the unending press of humanity. I had pulled my cane in and was standing still as the crowd broke like a wave around me. I finally had to be rescued by one of the roving convention hosts.

I have tried to talk about this stuff at conventions. There was some disability programming a couple of years ago, panels I pushed for about Disability in SF. Sadly, even this was problematic as Convergence put us in a space that was too small and difficult to access for our disabled fans in wheelchairs.

Last year, it was bad enough that I simply couldn't move around on my own. If I had to be on programming or some other event someone had to be with me, helping me as a sighted guide to move around the convention. It's the only convention I attend where I need a sighted guide, and I hate it. Hate the loss of independence. Hate that I have to take someone's time away from the convention because I can't function anymore: hated that if I wasn't being led around the convention from one programming item to the next, I had to retreat to the room because I can't managed to walk around the con on my own. If I was going back this year—if I ever go back—it is obvious I'll need a personal care assistant to help me with Convergence. And I hate that idea as well. I know. I know I'm a blind broken gimp and I shouldn't be so reticent to get the help I need and can legally ask for, but it takes all the enjoyment of the con away.

When it came time to try and get a room for Convergence, I was already thinking this might be my last year. Then came the day of trying to get a room; a day of more stress and frustration as once again the system crashed, some people seemed to have access to a backdoor and then all the room in the main hotel were gone, despite that fact I had done everything right and in a timely manner. It wasn't until this last weekend that we even knew if we could get a room in the hotel. By then, the decision to stop going to Convergence had been made.

I realized this year I was hating the idea of going to any of the 7 to 10 book festivals and conventions I attend every year. Not just Convergence, but all of them. That I just wanted to stay home all year. Hiding. The thought of going to conventions had me wanting to curl up with my confused cat and hide under the bed-covers. After talking it over with several people, I figured out it was just Convergence. I was so stressed at the very idea of dealing with Convergence that it was spoiling all the other conventions for me. Convergence comes at the end of my convention season and having it lurking out there in the horizon makes me anxious and angry and takes all the fun out of the other conventions.

A part of me hates to stop attending, especially this year. The theme is Urban Fantasy, which seems a slam-dunk for me as an author. I am a freakin' Urban Fantasy Author fer-cryin'-out-loud. I have two new books I haven't tried to sell at Convergence. Scott Lynch, one of the Guests of Honor, is my friend and another GoH, Emma Bull, is someone I like quite a bit. It has always been my best convention for sales. To walk away from such a great marketing opportunity seems silly.

And I don't have anything personally against Convergence. It is the convention it is, and thousands of people seem to enjoy being squeezed into the hotel with thousands of other con-goers. For many people, this is their favorite event of the year. Their vacation. The biggest bestest badest party ever.

Bless them. Bless them all.

But I just can't. I can't even.

Just the thought of Convergence makes me exhausted.

So it is time to stop.

And now I feel nothing but relief.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #13

Oney
This week was a strange and odd week for writing. I didn't get as much done as I thought I might, since I decided to go on the spring camping trip a friend of mine organizes. It was the first camping trip I'd been on in about 10 years, and I had a really good time. I even wrote at the camp! Yeah, things are moving slowly, perhaps too slowly, but I don't care. The project will get done when the project gets done, and I refuse to hurry the process.

It's not like I'm under contract and have a looming deadline, after all. If I want to take an entire year to write the first draft, that's my business. I have other project in the pipeline, things in the beta-process-heading-to-writers-group-soon-I-hope stuff. Plus, I'm about to take on another anthology project for MinnSpec.

1. Wrote about 1750 words.
2. Made about 800 words worth of notes and outlining.
3. Thought reallyreally hard about…stuff…
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #12

Oney
While the word count this week isn’t large, I still made strong forward progress with all the outlining and brainstorming and research. That I began the writing in the 1929 section at all is a win for me this week, since I am working with an almost entirely new cast of characters.

Most of this week’s new words were written at Butter Bakery and Café while hanging out with of writers. The hardest thing has been finding the right voice for this section. At the moment it seems to want to be written in a remote, almost dream-like style of prose. Whatever works.

I may not have anything to post next week, unfortunately. Life is being life and sometimes you have to deal with those life distractions and obligations even when all you want to do is write.

1. Wrote 1,015 new words
2. Researched clothing and living in late 1920s rural Oklahoma
3. Made more outline notes for the 1929 section
4. Studied more of my Oney: A Community History book
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #11 Plus Minicon Thoughts

Old Lynx
I had a pretty good Minicon this year. The two panels I was on were well attended and had both excellent panelists and thoughtful audiences. I played music three nights in a row, which was a little tough on my hands, but worth it. My reading was reasonably well attended and I sold a few books and signed a few more.

10277096_10152328791850138_7346936324522975136_n
*Photo courtesy of Baron Dave Romm

The three panels I attended were pretty good as well, though I had to sit on my hands and bit my tongue a couple times at the first one. I only made it to one reading this year, Cat Valente's, but I loved her story and reading-style. Made friends with some visiting musicians and got to help take them out for Malaysian food. On Saturday, three different people gave me three different types of cupcakes. It is a mystery as to why this happened, but I am not complaining. I mean, cupcakes!

But mostly what made it a great convention was hanging out with people--too many to name here--but Minicon felt more like a family reunion this year, maybe because I learned how to make my own fun at conventions. I am planning to return next year for the 50th Minicon celebration.

I didn't hardly work at all at the convention, which says something about how engaged I was, but I did work a little and even a little more yesterday.

1. Completed the first draft of the 1979 section
2. Added small scenes to the 1979 section to seed other sections
3. Made notes and started outlining 1929 section
4. Search for and added 1920s music to playlist.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #10.2

Oney
First Draft of the 1979 Section is complete.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #10

Oney
I am very nearly done with the 1979 section of the novel and in fact I am working on the final first draft scene of that section. I am having some trouble finishing it up, mostly because my brain doesn't want to write the ending I need to write. Part of me wants to treat this as the end of the piece, but in reality it is the part where the situation falls apart and sets up the finale in the 1999 section.

Working. Writing. Moving Forward.

1. Wrote about 3000 words this week.
2. Made some serious outline notes for the 1929 section.
3. Studied more Oney history.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Minicon Schedule 2014!

Old Lynx
FRIDAY, APRIL 18

Navigating the World of Small Press Publishing - 8:30-9:30PM - Veranda 7/8 (K)


SATURDAY, APRIL 19

Local References in Urban Fantasy - 11:30AM-12:30PM - Veranda 7/8 (K)

Reading - 3:30-4:30PM - Veranda 1/2

Signing - 5:00-5:30PM - Ballroom Foyer

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #9

Oney
More forward momentum. I'm still on track to be done with the 1979 section before April is over. Personal life has caused a bit of a slow-down and will continue to do so, but I am hopeful things have stabilized.

In the story itself, things are about to fall apart for the protagonists. Once I'm done here I plan to step back and write the 1929 section, which should be the shortest. I'm hoping the 1999 section will go quickly, since I will have it pretty much outlined to the finish of the first draft and have some developmental notes about what needs to be added for some character development.

1. About 2250 words written
2. More notes for the 1929 and 1999 sections
3. 1979 section outline complete. I just need to write it
4. Worked on some maps of Oney in 1979 based on my memory
5. Stated working on a map of Oney in 1929 based on a 1915 map and information in the community history book.
6. Drop a couple of songs from the playlist. Added a couple to the playlist.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Dark Waters

Dark Water
11 Dark Waters

Richard Martz is a bitter ex-mage cursed as punishment for the destruction of his previous magical coven. Richard is reluctantly drawn back into the word of magic and intrigue when he is approached by Holly Ellefson, daughter of a human mage. Holly is also part-fey, a bloodline taboo by both custom and treaty.

Agreeing to protect Holly, Richard pits his erratic, broken magic against the Twin Cities Magical Council. As Holly gains control over her fey abilities and the magical powers inherited from her mother, she discovers her family's deep secrets: secrets the Magical Council would rather stay buried.

Caught between multiple enemies, Richard and Holly race to unravel the mystery of Holly's heritage while healing the wounds of Richard's tragic past, even as the forces arrayed against them tighten their grip, threatening death—or worse—should Richard or Holly fall into their hands.

Dark Waters is available at
Alban Lake Publishing.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #8

Oney
I had a much better writing week. With no conventions, normal work hours, and feeling physically better, I was able to get back on track. I spent a small chunk of Saturday night and Sunday into the mid-afternoon writing, which was nice. Got more work done Monday night than usual. I will probably be done with the first draft of the 1979 timeline before the month of April is out. My teenaged protagonists are all three hip-deep in the mystery and striving with various degrees of success and failure, but lack the understanding, experience and power of their opponents.

1. About 3500 new words
2. Committed research online
3. Messed with the timelines, change 1936 to 1929 and 2000 back to 1999.
4. Started outlining the 1929 section
5. Read more on my Oney Community History Book

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Writing Process Blog Tour 2014

Old Lynx
Today is my day for the Writing Process Blog Tour, a blog tour where various writers discuss what they are working on and their process, tag the writer who talked them into it and finds other victims—er—other writers to participate. You the reader get to follow the various links to discover new writers. I'd like to thank J. Alan Erwine for asking me to take part. His own post is here: http://jalanerwine.blogspot.com/2014/03/my-writing-process-blog-tour.html

What Am I Working On?
At the moment my project is a new novel titled Ghosts of the Places We Live, though it is really three novellas intertwined together: a southern gothic horror piece that takes place in 1929, a secret history in 1979, and a ghost story/urban fantasy in 1999. It is set in the community of Oney, Oklahoma (Albert, Oklahoma according to the U.S. Government) a little place that was a big influence on my childhood and is today almost a ghost town. This novel is my small gesture at making sure this community is not forgotten and my nod to the memory of the place I love.

How Does My Work Differ From Others Of Its Genre?
This was a hard question for me to answer, because I don't think of myself as an innovator in anyway. I posed it to a couple of people who have read my stuff and I think they gave me good answers.

I am able to focus on both The Big Idea of a novel and the Small Intimate Stuff. I do world building and characters with equal ease and intertwine them together easily with a focus on the small stories of the characters, who tend to be people trying to find their way and place in the world.

I try to focus on characters who a disabled, othered, and chipped up by life, with an emphasizes not on their limitations, or on making them All Better Thanks To Science/Magic, or Look How Noble They Are Because They can Do Things, but on how they go about life and living.

Finally, I write like I do because I had a very solid Midwestern mentality imbued in me by my "We survived the Great Depression and World War II" grandparents. My characters tend to be practical, down to earth folks who Get Things Done Even When Things Get Weird. They are pragmatic people; firm, calm, quiet, competent at pretty much anything they do. A lot like my grandparents.

Why Do I Write What I Do?
I write the stories I do because I think there is a place in our genre for the quieter stories, stories that are driven by the characters instead of the Big Idea or massive world building or the monster of the book to fight/fornicate with. There is nothing wrong with any of the things above. I fact, I love all three of those things, but as a writer I like people and characters and their personal, intimate stories. I suppose besides a Midwestern mentality I also have realistic contemporary literature sensibilities with a strong dose of magical realism.

How Does Your Writing Process Work?
Mostly, I seem to flail around like a demented Muppet. I once had a system and process, but these days I'm in flux, trying to find my footing. On the days I work I’m usually too tired and brain fried to commit fiction in the evenings, but I am able to sort out plot points, do research, create basic scene outlines and blocking, and consider what I’ve written up to that point, making notes of adjustments I need to make. On the days I don’t work, I have all the notes and outlines in place so that I can simply sit down and write. On the two or three afternoons and evenings a week I have for writing, I can apply all the previous work, sit my butt down, and just start writing—writing to whatever point in the plot/outline I’m working on. And if that isn’t working I go write a different scene, which usually jogs lose my problems in the scene that had stalled.

Thanks for stopping by and reading my part of this blog hop/tour. I now pass the baton off to three most worthy and talented writers.

Conrad Zero is an author of dark fiction from Minneapolis, MN, and the front man for 'Northern Rock' band Jagged Spiral (www.jaggedspiral.com). He has a Bachelor's of Philosophy degree from the University of MN and a brown belt in Tae Kwon Do. When he's not writing deep-dark-sugar-pop song lyrics, he's writing deep-dark-sugar-pop fiction stories like Pinky The Invisible Flying Pony Vs The Giant Carnivorous, Poisonous, Exploding Spider-Leeches. No matter what he's doing, he always wears black, because it makes laundry day simple. Visit his website here.

Catherine Lundoff is the award-winning author of three short story collections: Crave: Tales of Lust, Love and Longing, Night's Kissand A Day at the Inn, A Night at the Palace and Other Stories, and one novel, Silver Moon. She is the editor of Haunted Hearths and Sapphic Shades: Lesbian Ghost Stories and co-editor, with JoSelle Vanderhooft, of Hellebore and Rue: Tales of Queer Women and Magic. Her stories have appeared in over 70 publications. Her works and papers are collected in the SFWA/Gender Studies Collections at the Northern Illinois University Library. Visit her website here.

Marissa Lingen is a speculative fiction writer living in the Minneapolis suburbs with two large men and one small dog. She has written over one hundred works of short fiction and is working on a novel. Visit her website here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #7

Oney
I almost didn't post this update because, well, I wrote almost nothing last week (330 words). It was kind of a perfect storm disaster of post-Paganicon exhaustion, dealing with being ill while making up my hours at work, and trying to catch up on everything else in life I have fallen behind on. Still, I had hopeful that this week will be better.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #6

Dice
Poor progress this week. I was sick after MarsCon and then had to prepare for Paganicon this previous weekend. I tried to work at the convention, but was too run-down to focus. I had hoped to get some work in yesterday and today, since I had off work, but page proofs for Dark Waters arrived and I'm still low-grade sick, so no writing in the last two days. I go back to work tomorrow, work on Saturday, have a million errands and other things to accomplice after work each night and a full weekend, more Dark Waters proofs and a dedication to figure out, MinnSpec stuff that needs my attention, and…

I'm not sure how much writing will get done this week either.

I'm…disappointed.

And now I just want to curl up in bed with a book and hot tea.

1. A few hundred new words.
2. Made a major timeline decision.
3. Studied my Oney: A Community History 1901 to 1980 book.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #5 With Bonus MarsCon Thoughts

Oney
Not much movement on the novel this week. Between Day Job, convention prep, and MarsCon itself, I didn't have a lot of time to work, though I did manage to get some words in the wee small hours and in between stuff at the convention. I refuse to beat myself up over this.

I had a really nice MarsCon, so much so that it is starting to feel more of home for me than any other Minneapolis convention, of which there are many fine ones. There were some hiccups and a slightly rocky start and apparently a short dust up with the Big Game Hunters (the other event in the hotel that weekend), but my panels were all great, I sold a few books, and I was a guest of the fabulous Rockstar Storytellers, something I had wanted to do for a couple of years.

Don't expect too much from me next week either, as Day Job is keeping me busy and I'm heading to Paganicon to play local author and teach a storytelling workshop. Plus, today I realized some stuff I thought was done is actually in need of major reworking, mostly because I figured out how that section story really ends.

Progress this week:
1. Wrote a couple thousand words.

2. Figured out a major tangle in the finale of the year 1979 section.

3. Came to a decision concerning the relationship status of three of the characters in the year 1979 section.

4. Made notes for the year 1936 section.

5. All these above led me to a necessary scene in the year 2000 section.

6. Added a couple of songs to the playlist. Cut a couple of songs from the playlist.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Speedy Call for Submissions

Old Lynx
Originally posted by timprov at Speedy Call for Submissions
Lydy at the Van Dusen House.

Lydy at the Van Dusen House.


So, I’m working on the prepress design for the print version of The Reader: War for the Oaks, which I’m planning to kickstart in April. (If you’ve been wondering why there’s been no movement for a while, it’s because I decided I wanted to run the Kickstarter during Minicon.)


Anyway, it feels light on text to me, and I have a few more pages to work with than I need, so I thought I’d commission essays in appreciation of War for the Oaks to go into the book along with the photos. I figure that’s something well in the wheelhouse of a lot of people reading this. (For clarity’s sake, that’s in appreciation of Emma Bull’s novel, not of my photos.)


Payment is $50 plus a copy of the book. I need to ask a question of my printer before I figure out the deadline, but you’ll have at least until March 21st. (Hopefully this will be updated soon.) Submissions via email to tim@tiredtapir.com.




Originally published at CREATE. EVALUATE. ITERATE.

Ghosts of the Places We Live Update #5

Oney
Things have slowed down considerably, to the point of it becoming frustrating for me. It isn't that I'm stuck, or having problems with the story, or am suffering from a lack of enthusiasm: it's that all my time over the last week was sucked up and all my time appears to be sucked up for the next couple of weeks as well, as if I'm living under the pounding brushes of a galactic Hoover.

This sucks

Meager progress is still progress.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Tags:

Marscon Schedule!

Old Lynx
These are the programming items I will be on at MarsCon this weekend.

Fiction Reading: Michael Merriam - Atrium 2 (Re(a)d Mars) - Friday 06:00pm
I will be reading from my new short story collection, Whisper in Space, and either from Old Blood's Fate or the soon to be released Dark Waters.

Mass Autographing - Exec Lounge (Krushenko’s) - Saturday 05:00 pm
Get your books and stuff signed by our Author and Science GOHs, and other pros.
With: Esther Friesner, Bridget Landry, Cynthia Booth, Roy C. Booth, Stryder Dancewollfe, Patrick W. Marsh, Michael Merriam, Kathryn Sullivan.

Time is Key for Artists! - Atrium 2 (Re(a)d Mars)- Saturday 06:00 pm
Finding time in your busy life to practice your art. Most of us in the arts community, whether writers, actors, visual artist, or musicians, need to at least work part-time to pay the bills and most of us work full-time while pursuing our artist careers. Come discuss strategies for carving our time to work on the thing that nourishes your soul.
With: Michael Merriam, mod.; S.N. Arly, Haddayr Copley-Woods, Stryder Dancewolffe

Rockstar Storytellers - Atrium 4 (Mainstage) - Saturday 10:00 pm
Modern day stories told with a rockstar flair.
With: Rob Callahan, Phillip Low, Courtney McLean, Laura Bidgood and guest Michael Merriam.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.

Latest Month

July 2014
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Lizzy Enger